/Lund University Develops Super-Efficient Truck Engine

Lund University Develops Super-Efficient Truck Engine

lund truck engines at Lund University Develops Super Efficient Truck Engine

In response to the new new fuel efficiency standards for large trucks were announced by President Obama, researchers at Lund University in Sweden revealed an ingenious solution to enhance the efficiency of gasoline engines. Their solution is a modified diesel engine running on gasoline.

Lund’s eggheads argue that gasoline in truck diesel engines can give more than 50% efficiency if the combustion process is done correctly. To put this idea into practice, they modified the engine to achieve the right amount of ignition delay between fuel injection and combustion. During this delay the mixing process produces minimal amounts of soot and nitric oxide.

We don’t know how hard they thought to realize this obscure little fact, but the advantages are huge. The Lund University’ super-efficient truck engine indicates 57% efficiency (50% on the output shaft). When you realize that big trucks consumed 28 billion gallons of gasoline in 2011 in the US alone, you appreciate the positive effect of this solution.

Lund University’s solution not only results in significant fuel saving, the CO2 level emitted by commercial trucks will be drastically reduced. And all it takes is a few nanoseconds of delay between ignitions! For students that are getting prepared for their exams this ielts preparation course can help you achieving good scores.

“A reasonably efficient engine today would be in the range of 40-42%. We’re hoping to achieve 60% with this type of PPC combustion process”, says Bengt Johansson, Professor of Combustion Engines at Lund University.

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