/Toyota GT86 Honors its Racing Brethren with Classic Liveries

Toyota GT86 Honors its Racing Brethren with Classic Liveries

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At this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed Toyota will showcase six specially-prepared Toyota GT86 models each outfitted with a classic racing livery celebrating great Toyota race and rally cars of the past. It’s hard to tell by the cars they make, but Toyota has a fairly glorious Motorsport history, and this is a very cool way of boasting about it.

Each classic-liveried Toyota GT86 is inspired by a different race car. The list includes the original 2000GT, Andersson’s 1970s Celica 1600GT, IMSA GTU Celica from the 80s, the World Rally Championship Celica GT-Four and the Esso Ultron Tiger Supra from the All-Japan Grand Touring Car Championship.

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Apart from the livery, each of these celebratory GT86s are also equipped with lowered springs, stainless steel exhaust and retro-styled wheels, emphasizing what they stand for. It could also be interpreted as Toyota’s way of saying there are hotter GT86 versions in the works – although we’ve heard that lie so many times we are not going to fall for it again.

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This one-off Toyota GT86 classic livery collection will debut at the Goodwood Festival of Speed’s Moving Motor Show on 25 June and they will be available for public test drive on the hill. After that they will serve as eye candy for the GT86 Drift Experience.

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