/Tokyo Motor Show: Honda EV-STER Concept

Tokyo Motor Show: Honda EV-STER Concept

Honda EV Ster Concept 1 at Tokyo Motor Show: Honda EV STER Concept

The EV-STER, unveiled at 2011 Tokyo Motor Show, is Honda’s idea of a modern sports car.

This next-generation electric small sports concept is of course powered by an 58 kW electric motor that promises high driving performance and range of approximately 160km. The Ster is a lightweight two-seater roadster and the power goes to the rear wheels, so on paper it has the perfect recipe for a fun and agile sports car.

Honda promises a 0 to 100 km/h sprint time of 5.0 seconds, which is good, and a top speed of 160 km/h, which isn’t really.

We are particularly fond of the styling. It is kinda nice and chiseled and because it is so compact it will be very easy to live it. You know, if they ever made it.

We can’t comment on the interior though, seeing as it’s more like the cockpit of a jet or something, with a twin-lever joystick for the steering. Furthermore, the instrument panel features not only meters, but also the vehicle information display which enables the driver to enjoy driving as well as the network display used for the audio and navigation systems and also for the internet access. The well-designed layout of the meters and displays enables the driver to concentrate on driving and enjoy the comfortable space. It’s all a bit too fancy.

Honda EV-Ster checks all the right boxes for a modern sports roadster. They give it a petrol engine and it’s a proper Mazda MX-5 rival. The electric powertrain still has the problem of long recharge time, which in this case is 6 hours.

Honda EV Ster Concept 2 at Tokyo Motor Show: Honda EV STER Concept
Honda EV Ster Concept 3 at Tokyo Motor Show: Honda EV STER Concept
Honda EV Ster Concept 4 at Tokyo Motor Show: Honda EV STER Concept
Honda EV Ster Concept 5 at Tokyo Motor Show: Honda EV STER Concept

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(Founder / Chief Editor / Journalist) – Arman is the original founder of Motorward.com, which he kept until August 2009. Currently Arman is our chief editor and is held responsible for a large part of the news we publish.