/Atalanta Motors to Launch First Model since 1939 at Windsor Castle Concours

Atalanta Motors to Launch First Model since 1939 at Windsor Castle Concours

Atalanta Motors return 600x372 at Atalanta Motors to Launch First Model since 1939 at Windsor Castle Concours

You can tell Britain’s economy and manufacturing are in good shape these days a sports car maker that hasn’t in the business since 1939 is gearing up for a return to the scene. The company in question is Atalanta Motors and they will launch their first completed model at the Concours of Elegance 2016 at Windsor Castle next month.

Unlike most other old British sports car makers who died away because they made terrible rubbish or because the economic climate made it impossible for them to survive, Atalanta Motors had to stop production in 1939, after producing only 21 cars, due to the outbreak of World War II. So yes, they have a good excuse for not making it the first time round and definitely deserve another shot at the game.

The car Atalanta is set to reveal at Windsor Castle Concours is described as a modern sports car “that stays true in spirit and design to the original.” So it’ll something in the same league as Morgan and Caterham, which is cool. We’re not entirely sure about the modern part though, as the car features a traditional aluminium over ash construction and gets a four-cylinder engine.

James Brooks-Ward, Concours of Elegance Director, said: “The Concours of Elegance is all about the incredible passion and dedication of the motoring world, and that’s why we’re privileged to see the first reborn Atalanta at our event. A little more than 75 years after the brand produced its last model, visitors will have an opportunity to get up close to a reborn icon in the incredible historic surroundings of Windsor Castle.”

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

(Founder / Chief Editor / Journalist) – Arman is the original founder of Motorward.com, which he kept until August 2009. Currently Arman is our chief editor and is held responsible for a large part of the news we publish.